Dutch landscapes 3 – Along the river

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52 reacties op β€˜Dutch landscapes 3 – Along the river’

    • petergreyphotography

      Thanks a lot! The sculpture is at the river IJssel at Doesburg, a lovely, small and old city near Arnhem. I don’t know what it is about really, but the guys are dressed vermillion suits, so they warmly lit up even on a somber day (wich is luckely was not when I made this picture πŸ™‚ )

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    • petergreyphotography

      Thank you Nicole! That picture was made at one of the arms of the river Rhine, coming from Germany and branching out in the low lying delta wich western Netherlands in fact is. This stretch past the city of Arnhem is called the Nederrijn (lower Rhine). It was a lovely half cloudy day and the light was accordingly wonderful.

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  1. sloppy buddhist

    oh I love the land…I can feel a slight breeze and I always have a ‘home’ kind of feeling when I see your work…and your compositions are wonderful Peter…wonderful tonal qualities…many smiles over the pond β˜ΊοΈπŸ’« hedy

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    • petergreyphotography

      Thank you Hedy! You having a home kind of feeling I find a great compliment. It means my images seem to touch some ‘soul memories’, wich of course is wonderful. There are so many things to be seen and when once in a while some of these things can be ‘Γ§aptured’ we did our job well. πŸ™‚

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    • petergreyphotography

      Zeker nait! πŸ™‚ Na al dat kleurengeweld van een vroege hoogzomer even terug naar stemmig grijs. En daarna waarschijnlijk weer naar iets van kleur, je weet het niet. Ik weet niet of je van de zomer houdt (ik wel!) maar als dat het geval is dan kunnen we ons hart in deze dagen ophalen!

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        • petergreyphotography

          De herfst! is ook mooi. Duurt nog wel een poosje in ons nieuwe klimaat. Ik geloof dat voor dit jaar de herfst gepland staat in de eerste week van december. Hij gaat twee weken duren. Dan een weekje winter. Drie en een halve week lente, en dan weer zomer. Of zoiets. Maar misschien heb je geluk en duurt de herfst dit jaar drie weken! πŸ™‚

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  2. equinoxio21

    Dankje wel! Great photos. So much a reminder of my childhood days in Amsterdam, fighting the facing wind on my bike. (No basket then)
    Now comes the important question: can you still buy a basket without a bike attached to it?
    πŸ˜‰
    Tot ziens

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    • petergreyphotography

      Graag gedaan and thank you! Today I went out for a walk (I am not much of a bike-person no more ) and along the way I met a lot (!) of mostly older people on their sunday (it’s tweede pinksterdag, second pentacost day) bike ride. As you might remember bike riding for purposes of leisure is a favorite passtime of the Dutch. There was a rather strong wind from the east (hence the truly wonderful weather we are having these last weeks) and I heard a woman grumble: ‘They are all passing us! They have electric bikes! We don’t!’ So yes, bikes and wind – still there πŸ™‚ And baskets…. yep, I suppose so…. I haven’t been buying a basket for quite a long time I must add, but I’m pretty sure baskets are to be had seperately still. πŸ™‚
      Tot ziens!

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      • equinoxio21

        Bikes to me in Holland were the key to freedom. We’d come from Africa, where all was done in a car, and all a of a sudden (I’m ten) I have a bike and I can go anywhere? Just mention the destination and when I will be home? Freedom!!!
        Have a great week. Enjoy global warming. πŸ˜‰

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    • petergreyphotography

      Thank you Dwight! The statue is in the tiny city of Doesburg at the river IJssel. There is a whole string of old cities along the river, all once part of ‘Hanze’, a medieval trade association mainly for cities around the Baltic sea (up to St. Petersburg). Also some Dutch cities joined this association. This got nothing to do with the statue, but I myself always find it amazing how international trade worked already in those days. It is called, I just read, Passi d’ Oro, meaning the walkers. It’s by Roberto Barni, from who, I now see, also a staue is in my home city Groningen. (Never knew it was from him. One keeps learning every day! πŸ™‚ ) So, I guess that’s just it: walkers. The interesting thing is I find the sense of perspective. The guys (in vermillion suits) are walking side by side, but they could as well have been walking behind each other at quite some distance. When the sun sets they light up in a warm orangy hue and more or less become one with the sky. They kind of dissapear for a short while – walked away, out of our eyes.

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      • rothpoetry

        This is so interesting. I saw them walking one behind the other in a sweeping curve. How interesting. Trade seems to be how the world got settled. The Dutch did their part as well. Thank you for the Art History lesson. Keep up the good work.

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    • petergreyphotography

      Thank you! The three figures litterally are ‘outstanding’ aren’t they? πŸ™‚ I’ve tried to find out what the meaning of the sculpture is but didn’t really find a clue. Perhaps the idea is movement, flowing, like a river flows, from one country into another into yet another maybe, till it reaches the sea. Maybe it (also) explores the sense of perspective. Whatever the thought has been, it is a compelling sight, the men striding towards us, especially when the sun is sinking behind their backs and setting the world on fire.

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